News & Events

Fuel at Paspaley Pearls, Kuri Bay Not Available.

Note!! (Updated 4/12/21). Due to Covid travel restrictions into Western Australia, Paspaley Pearls Kuri Bay operation can have no direct interaction between their staff, and crew/passengers on board vessels sailing through the area. This means that fuel is not available, and going ashore at Kuri Bay is prohibited, except in an emergency.

They are also basing a smaller mother ship at their Vansittart Bay and Osborne Islands pearl farms, which means that their capacity to supply fuel from the mother ship will be reduced. If you are planning on getting fuel from their Vansittart/Osborne Islands pearl farms for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022, you should contact their Darwin Office well in advance to ensure they are able to supply your needs.

The situation may change if the WA Government relaxes Covid restrictions in 2022. KCCYC will post an update here if things change.

2021 Annual Beach Party Another Successful Day.

Shady spot on Cave Beach

We had over 20 boats with around 50 people RSVP for the 4th July Beach Party this year, but like many Kimberley coast cruising plans, things changed. We ended up with 24 crew off 11 boats on the day. Given that this is one of the most remote places on the Australian coast for cruising boats to reach, we were all excited to be there.Read more ....

Planning your cruise to the Kimberley in 2022?

Post a brief outline of your sailing plans on the KCCYC forum to meet up with other vessels, ask questions, get info etc. https://kccyc.org.au/topic/boats-sailing-to-the-kimberley-in-2022/

Also get onto our forum pages if you have any questions, or search the existing forum posts, as your question may already be answered

List of Places to Visit along the Kimberley Coast.

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If you’re planning your first sailing or power boat trip along the Kimberley Coast, you are probably struggling with decisions on choosing which of the hundreds of places you want to visit in the limited time you will be at sea in the area.

Don’t expect to see everything in one dry season, even if you plan to be out there for 6 months. There is just too much to see and do. Even our most experienced KCCYC Members, with multiple seasons under their belts sailing and exploring the area, will tell you there is always somewhere new to discover each time they visit the Kimberley.

To help you choose your cruising plan, we have put together a list of the interesting, popular, and scenic places generally visited by private cruising boats. We’ve also included a few “out of the way” spots that aren’t often visited.

We’ve also linked a heap of info to many of the locations for you to research.

KCCYC Members can download the list from the Anchorages pages here.

We have no idea of everyone’s interests, capabilities, cruising speed, fuel range etc. But hopefully the list will assist you as a tool to make plans based on your particular parameters.

The Barra are Biting in the Kimberley Coast.

Paul, a long standing Kimberley Member and Manager at McGowan Island Camping Ground, sent me these photos of a few of the Barra caught by him and friends late January 2020 in a Kimberley river.

See some great wet season photos of the Kimberley coast at https://www.facebook.com/McGowansSunsetBeachCampingWA/

 

Fuel Available From McGowan Island Camp 2020.

(Update 5/12/21) Please be aware that due to Covid 19 restrictions on entry to remote Aboriginal Communities, fuel supplies from McGowan Island Camp did not eventuate in 2020. We are unsure if fuel will be available in future dry seasons, therefore you should make your own enquiries regarding fuel availability before sailing. Or contact Ross through the Contacts page for any recent updates.

McGowan Island Camping Ground is under new management with the return of Paul after a 9 year break away from McGowan, working in the marine industry in Darwin and Port Douglas.

Canon Charters loading fuel at McGowan from the fuel tanker in 2010.

Paul is arranging for bulk diesel to be available from McGowan Island Camping Ground in the 2020 dry season. The plan is to moor a 24,000 litre dumb barge off the beach at McGowan for boats to load diesel. Smaller amounts of diesel and ULP will be available on shore from 19,000 litre tanks for diesel, and 200 litre drums for ULP.

Fuel supplies are barged in from Wyndham, which can take several days to organise if he runs short. So if you’ve got big tanks, you will need to let him know you are coming, and approximately how much fuel you need. As we get closer to the dry season, I will update KCCYC members on when the fuel is likely to start flowing, but the plan at this point is to have the barge in place late April, early May 2020.

Fuel Availability along the Kimberley Coast and across the top end from Cairns to Darwin.

Loading fuel from a Shorelands barge at West Bay, near Truscott Air Base

We recently updated the Anchorage Pages with the latest information on buying marine fuel along the Kimberley coast between Wyndham and Broome. KCCYC members can download the pdf from https://kccyc.org.au/anchorage-pdf-downloads/ 

We also added a new page to the website with a Google map showing the main marine fuel locations between Cairns and Broome. https://kccyc.org.au/northern-australia-marine-fuel-queensland-to-west-australia/

Crocodiles are getting cheekier and more aggressive on the Kimberley Coast. Dinghy attacked, crew stranded.

Two recent accounts of crocodiles stalking boaties on Kimberley Coast waters should serve as a warning to vessels cruising northern Australian waters. Rubber duckies, small dinghies and paddling craft such as kayaks are not suitable as tenders in this area.

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This monster 6M croc followed the writer’s dinghy in Mudge Bay 2013. Possibly the same croc in the Water Pipe Bay incident.

A recent report was of an attack near Water Pipe Bay in Swift Bay around late 2013 dry season. We’re waiting on a first hand account of the incident, but its understood the croc tore the transom out of a small RIB and stalked the 2 crew for days. They were stranded ashore, living off oysters, and luckily managed to find fresh water. Rescue came by way of experienced Darwin based boaties who were about to leave the area and spotted the stranded couple waving frantically.Read more ....